‘As We May Think’ – part 3

Besides creating audio records instead of writing information down, an image says more than a thousand words. Vannevar Bush already envisioned an entirely different experience for researchers.

One can now picture a future investigator in his laboratory. His hands are free, and he is not anchored. As he moves about and observes, he photographs and comments. Time is automatically recorded to tie the two together.[1]

Although still images already provide a lot of information together with their tags, commenting while photographing might be easier using a video camera. Most devices such as laptops, tablets and mobile phones already contain cameras, but a Go Pro or other hands free camera increases the ease of use. However video production consists of planning during pre-production, capturing during production and processing in the post-production phase.[2] Bush was already aware of these phases.

As he ponders over his notes in the evening, he again talks his comments into the record. His typed record, as well as his photographs, may both be in miniature, so that he projects them for examination.[3]

The process of recording information is constantly improving, especially after the invention of an optical head-mounted display such as Google Glasses. It displays information and communicates with the internet using natural language voice commands. Furthermore the glasses include a touchpad and a camera which can take photos or record videos just by voicing the command “record a video”.[4] This technology can improve the research process since it “1) provides workflow guidance to the user, 2) supports hands-free operation, 3) allows the users to focus on their work, and 4) enables an efficient way for collaborating with a remote expert”.[5] Although the glasses were already tested in the healthcare and industry maintenance fields, the Glass Explorer program ceased to exist. Ivy Ross and Tony Fadell took over, but the release date of their new product remains unknown.[6]

[1] Bush. “As We May Think,” Chapter 3.

[2] Dustin Freeman, Stephanie Santosa, Fanny Chevalier, Ravin Balakrishnan and Karan Sing, “LACES: live authoring through compositing and editing of streaming video,” Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2014, 1207-1216, doi: 2556288.2557304.

[3] Bush, “As We May Think,” Chapter 3.

[4] “Google Glass,” Wikipedia, accessed March 7, 2016. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Glass.

[5] Xianjun Sam Zheng, Patrik Matos da Silva, Cedric Foucault Siddharth Dasari, Meng Yuan, Stuart Goose. “Wearable Solution for Industrial Maintenance,” Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstract on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2015, 311-314, doi: 702613.2725442.

[6] Nick Bilton. “Why Google Glass Broke,” The New York Times, accessed March 7, 2016, http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/05/style/why-google-glass-broke.html?smid=nytcore-iphone-share&smprod=nytcore-iphone&_r=1.

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